Bitcoin: A Peer-to-Peer Electronic Cash System
2008-10-31 - Link

By convention, the first transaction in a block is a special transaction that starts a new coin owned by the creator of the block. This adds an incentive for nodes to support the network, and provides a way to initially distribute coins into circulation, since there is no central authority to issue them. The steady addition of a constant of amount of new coins is analogous to gold miners expending resources to add gold to circulation. In our case, it is CPU time and electricity that is expended.

Bitcoin Economics, Mining


Bitcoin: A Peer-to-Peer Electronic Cash System
2008-10-31 - Link

The network is robust in its unstructured simplicity. Nodes work all at once with little coordination. They do not need to be identified, since messages are not routed to any particular place and only need to be delivered on a best effort basis. Nodes can leave and rejoin the network at will, accepting the proof-of-work chain as proof of what happened while they were gone. They vote with their CPU proof-of-worker, expressing their acceptance of valid blocks by working on extending them and rejecting invalid blocks by refusing to work on them. Any needed rules and incentives can be enforced with this consensus mechanism.

Mining, Nodes


Bitcoin: A Peer-to-Peer Electronic Cash System
2008-10-31 - Link

We consider the scenario of an attacker trying to generate an alternate chain faster than the honest chain. Even if this is accomplished, it does not throw the system open to arbitrary changes, such as creating value out of thin air or taking money that never belonged to the attacker. Nodes are not going to accept an invalid transaction as payment, and honest nodes will never accept a block containing them. An attacker can only try to change one of his own transactions to take back money he recently spent.

Mining, Proof-of-Work


Bitcoin: A Peer-to-Peer Electronic Cash System
2008-10-31 - Link

The incentive may help encourage nodes to stay honest. If a greedy attacker is able to assemble more CPU proof-of-worker than all the honest nodes, he would have to choose between using it to defraud people by stealing back his payments, or using it to generate new coins. He ought to find it more profitable to play by the rules, such rules that favour him with more new coins than everyone else combined, than to undermine the system and the validity of his own wealth.

Bitcoin Economics, Mining


Re: Bitcoin P2P e-cash paper
2008-11-03 - Link

The Bitcoin network might actually reduce spam by diverting zombie farms to generating bitcoins instead.

Mining


Re: Bitcoin P2P e-cash paper
2008-11-03 - Link

The requirement is that the good guys collectively have more CPU proof-of-worker than any single attacker.

Mining


Re: Bitcoin P2P e-cash paper
2008-11-03 - Link

There would be many smaller zombie farms that are not big enough to overproof-of-worker the network, and they could still make money by generating bitcoins. The smaller farms are then the "honest nodes". (I need a better term than "honest") The more smaller farms resort to generating bitcoins, the higher the bar gets to overproof-of-worker the network, making larger farms also too small to overproof-of-worker it so that they may as well generate bitcoins too. According to the "long tail" theory, the small, medium and merely large farms put together should add up to a lot more than the biggest zombie farm.

Mining


Re: Bitcoin P2P e-cash paper
2008-11-03 - Link

Even if a bad guy does overproof-of-worker the network, it's not like he's instantly rich. All he can accomplish is to take back money he himself spent, like bouncing a check. To exploit it, he would have to buy something from a merchant, wait till it ships, then overproof-of-worker the network and try to take his money back. I don't think he could make as much money trying to pull a carding scheme like that as he could by generating bitcoins. With a zombie farm that big, he could generate more bitcoins than everyone else combined.

Mining


Re: Bitcoin P2P e-cash paper
2008-11-08 - Link

As computers get faster and the total computing proof-of-worker applied to creating bitcoins increases, the difficulty increases proportionally to keep the total new production constant. Thus, it is known in advance how many new bitcoins will be created every year in the future.

Mining, Difficulty


Re: Bitcoin P2P e-cash paper
2008-11-09 - Link

It is strictly necessary that the longest chain is always considered the valid one. Nodes that were present may remember that one branch was there first and got replaced by another, but there would be no way for them to convince those who were not present of this. We can't have subfactions of nodes that cling to one branch that they think was first, others that saw another branch first, and others that joined later and never saw what happened. The CPU proof-of-worker proof-of-work vote must have the final say. The only way for everyone to stay on the same page is to believe that the longest chain is always the valid one, no matter what.

Mining, Proof-of-Work, Nodes


Re: Bitcoin P2P e-cash paper
2008-11-14 - Link

Broadcasts will probably be almost completely reliable. TCP transmissions are rarely ever dropped these days, and the broadcast protocol has a retry mechanism to get the data from other nodes after a while. If broadcasts turn out to be slower in practice than expected, the target time between blocks may have to be increased to avoid wasting resources. We want blocks to usually propagate in much less time than it takes to generate them, otherwise nodes would spend too much time working on obsolete blocks.

Mining, Nodes


Re: Bitcoin P2P e-cash paper
2008-11-17 - Link

The proof-of-work is a Hashcash style SHA-256 collision finding. It's a memoryless process where you do millions of hashes a second, with a small chance of finding one each time. The 3 or 4 fastest nodes' dominance would only be proportional to their share of the total CPU proof-of-worker. Anyone's chance of finding a solution at any time is proportional to their CPU proof-of-worker.

Mining, Proof-of-Work


Bitcoin v0.1 released
2009-01-09 - Link

You can get coins by getting someone to send you some, or turn on Options->Generate Coins to run a node and generate blocks. I made the proof-of-work difficulty ridiculously easy to start with, so for a little while in the beginning a typical PC will be able to generate coins in just a few hours. It'll get a lot harder when competition makes the automatic adjustment drive up the difficulty. Generated coins must wait 120 blocks to mature before they can be spent.

Mining


Re: Repost: Bitcoin Maturation
2009-11-22 - Link

Think of it as a cooperative effort to make a chain. When you add a link, you must first find the current end of the chain. If you were to locate the last link, then go off for an hour and forge your link, come back and link it to the link that was the end an hour ago, others may have added several links since then and they're not going to want to use your link that now branches off the middle.

Mining


Re: A few suggestions
2009-12-12 - Link

The average total coins generated across the network per day stays the same. Faster machines just get a larger share than slower machines. If everyone bought faster machines, they wouldn't get more coins than before.

Mining


Re: A few suggestions
2009-12-12 - Link

We should have a gentleman's agreement to postpone the GPU arms race as long as we can for the good of the network. It's much easer to get new users up to speed if they don't have to worry about GPU drivers and compatibility. It's nice how anyone with just a CPU can compete fairly equally right now.

Mining


Re: What's with this odd generation?
2010-02-14 - Link

If you're sad about paying the fee, you could always turn the tables and run a node yourself and maybe someday rake in a 0.44 fee yourself.

Mining, Fees, Nodes


Re: Bitcoin minting is thermodynamically perverse
2010-08-09 - Link

The heat from your computer is not wasted if you need to heat your home. If you're using electric heat where you live, then your computer's heat isn't a waste. It's equal cost if you generate the heat with your computer. If you have other cheaper heating than electric, then the waste is only the difference in cost. If it's summer and you're using A/C, then it's twice. Bitcoin generation should end up where it's cheapest. Maybe that will be in cold climates where there's electric heat, where it would be essentially free.

Mining


Re: Potential disaster scenario
2010-08-15 - Link

Some places where generation will gravitate to: 1) places where it's cheapest or free 2) people who want to help for idealogical reasons 3) people who want to get some coins without the inconvenience of doing a transaction to buy them There are legitimate places where it's free. Generation is basically free anywhere that has electric heat, since your computer's heat is offsetting your baseboard electric heating. Many small flats have electric heat out of convenience.

Mining